Researchers breathe new life into COPD research using mouse models

Researchers revealed that the immune cells basophils caused emphysema in mice with COPD-like features induced by intranasal administration of elastase. They showed that basophils, previously linked mainly to allergies and fighting parasites, initiated a cascade of reactions eventually leading to the release of excess MMP-12 and the destruction of alveolar walls. The team hopes that the findings will lead to breakthroughs in the treatment of COPD. Source

Activated PMN exosomes are pathogenic entities that cause destruction in the COPD lung

Researchers have found a novel, pathogenic entity that is a fundamental link between chronic inflammation and tissue destruction in lungs of patients with COPD. These exosomes from activated neutrophils caused COPD damage when they were instilled into the lungs of healthy mice. Remarkably, neutrophil exosomes from the lung fluids of human patients with COPD and neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia also caused COPD lung damage when put into the lungs of healthy mice. Source

Can scientists change mucus to make it easier to clear, limiting harm to lungs?

For people with conditions such as cystic fibrosis and COPD, mucus can get too thick and sticky; coughing alone can’t clear it. Infections develop, leading to severe chronic disease and early death. Now, for the first time, scientists have shown why coughing often cannot tear mucus apart and away from the airway lining. And they showed how to make mucus thinner and less sticky so coughing can become a therapeutic aid. Source