Respiratory virus builds ‘doorbell’ to trick its way into cells

New research from microbiologists has shed light on how the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) — one of the most common viral infections — breaks into our cells to cause infection. Researchers discovered that RSV tricks cells into letting it in by essentially ringing a doorbell that calls its receptor to the virus waiting at the door. Source

Researchers map SARS-CoV-2 infection in cells of nasal cavity, bronchia, lungs

Researchers have characterized the specific ways in which SARS-CoV-2 infects the nasal cavity to a great degree — replicating specific cell types — and infects and replicates progressively less well in cells lower down the respiratory tract. The findings suggest the virus tends to become firmly established first in the nasal cavity, but in some cases the virus is aspirated into the lungs, where it may cause more serious disease, including potentially fatal pneumonia. Source

Pediatric coronavirus disease (COVID-19) X-ray, CT in review of new lung disorders

Although the clinical symptoms of SARS, H1N1, MERS, EVALI, and COVID-19 may be nonspecific, some characteristic imaging findings are emerging, according to a new article. Careful evaluation of the distribution, lung zone preference, and symmetry of the abnormalities with an eye for a few unique differentiating imaging features can allow radiologists to offer a narrower differential diagnosis in pediatric patients, leading to optimal patient care. Source