Snorers suffer from nerve and muscle damage in the palate

People who snore may have extensive tissue damage in the nerves and muscles of the soft palate. This can in turn create problems with swallowing and contribute to development of sleep apnea. Treatment strategies aimed at early intervention to stop snoring might have beneficial effects in healing or preventing development of sleep apnea. Source

COPD-associated inflammation halted in model experiment

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD for short, is believed to be the third most common cause of death worldwide. However, because the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown, today’s treatments can only slow progression of the disease. Scientists have now reported a previously unknown pathogenic mechanism, which they have already been able to prevent in the laboratory. Source

Formidable duo: Protective effect of CD9 and CD81 in COPD and accelerated aging

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disease of accelerated lung aging, but the mechanism remains unclear. Researchers studied the aging-like phenotype and its underlying mechanisms in a COPD mouse model. Double deletion of tetraspanins CD9 and CD81 in epithelial cells downregulated expression of the protein SIRT. As SIRT1 is a key molecule that protects against various lifestyle-related diseases and aging, these tetraspanins may serve as novel therapeutic targets for COPD and aging. Source

Almost 100 million adults have COPD in China

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is widespread in China with 8.6 percent of the country’s adult population — almost 100 million people — suffering from the chronic lung disease, according to a new study. The study, which provided lung-function screenings for more than 50,990 participants, is the largest survey of COPD across age groups ever conducted in China. Source

Three-quarters of COPD cases are linked to childhood risk factors that are exacerbated in adulthood

Three-quarters of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cases have their origins in poor lung function pathways beginning in childhood. These pathways are associated with exposures in childhood, and amplified by factors in adulthood, according to a cohort study. While smoking remains the biggest risk factor for COPD, the study demonstrates that childhood illnesses (such as asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, allergic rhinitis, eczema) and exposures to parental smoking are also linked to the disease. Source