Common sleep myths compromise good sleep and health

People often say they can get by on five or fewer hours of sleep, that snoring is harmless, and that having a drink helps you to fall asleep. These are, in fact, among the most widely held myths about sleeping that not only shape poor habits, but may also pose a significant public health threat. Source

Obstructive sleep apnea linked to inflammation, organ dysfunction

Voyagers no longer embark in search of the storied Fountain of Youth, but the quest for longevity is still very much alive for researchers. Chronological age — the passing of time one spends on this planet — cannot be reversed, of course. However, biological age — one’s health relative to that of one’s peers — can be turned back. Healthy lifestyle habits contribute to “aging well,” meaning one’s biological age is younger than one’s chronological age, researchers said. And sleep is a major factor in how well one ages. Source

Sleep apnea creates gaps in life memories

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is estimated to affect over 936 million people worldwide, and people with OSA are known to suffer memory problems and depression. New research builds on the known links between depression and memory, finding that people with untreated OSA have problems recalling specific details about their lives. Source

Poor sleep and heart-related death

Elderly men who experience extended episodes of interrupted breathing while asleep have a high risk of heart problems. Research shows for the first time that poor blood oxygenation is a good indicator of the chance of heart-related death, which cannot be attributed to sleep apnoea alone. Source