Medicine-carriers made from human cells can cure lung infections

Scientists used human white blood cell membranes to carry two drugs, an antibiotic and an anti-inflammatory, directly to infected lungs in mice. The nano-sized drug delivery method successfully treated both the bacterial growth and inflammation in the mice’s lungs. The study shows a potential new strategy for treating infectious diseases, including COVID-19. Source

Healthy muscles are a carrot on a string for healthy lungs

Scientists show effectiveness of carrot-based Japanese herbal medicine called ‘Ninjin’yoeito’ in improving muscle atrophy in the hind legs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke, positioning the medicine as a potential treatment for sarcopenia frailty-related complications with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Source

Gut microbes: a key to normal sleep

Researchers used a cocktail of antibiotics to deplete gut microbes in mice. They found that metabolites in the gut differed in these mice compared with controls. In particular, metabolic pathways involved in making important neurotransmitters like serotonin were affected. Additionally, these mice showed abnormal day-night distribution in sleep/wake patterns, particularly the amount of REM sleep, and frequent transitions between REM and non-REM sleep episodes. Source